Weight and Loading Tire Tips

Long tire life and safe travel is aided by understanding your tire load rating.  Note that the pressure figure on the sidewall of an ST tire (“Special Tire” code for RVs/trailers/truck tires) designates the minimum pressure necessary to carry the maximum load.  In other words, if a tire reads “Max load single: 3000 lbs at 65 psi cold”, the 65 psi is the minimum cold inflation pressure required to carry the maximum load. So it is sometimes advisable to inflate your tires to above the recommended minimum pressure for smoother riding and safety. Also, make sure that dual tires on the same side have the same inflation pressure.
Correct inflation pressure will give you the best fuel economy, tracking, ride, and longevity; it will also help prevent damage that can cause sudden tire failure.  Tire pressure should always be checked when the tires are cold, so early morning is best.  If you do get a flat that destroys a tire, make sure that the replacement tire has the same load rating that matches or exceeds the rating of your original tires.
“Intended use” is the primary difference between truck/trailer tires, and passenger vehicle tires.  An automotive tire must meet concerns of durability, good overall performance, low noise, ride comfort, and wet traction.  But an automotive tire is not frequently called upon to carry heavy loads for long periods of time.
The primary objectives of an RV/truck/trailer tire are load-carrying capacity, low rolling resistance, stability and long life.  These types of tires may include different steel belts, plies and beads, and also the use of thicker cords and larger diameter wire.   And they utilize a narrower tread width for reduced rolling resistance, and a shallower tread depth, which aids in tracking.  Additionally, they also contain rubber compounds that help them hold up to the elements better while in storage.

Weight and loading tire tips:

Long tire life and safe travel is aided by understanding your tire load rating. Here are some weight and loading tips.

Note that the pressure figure on the sidewall of an ST tire (“Special Tire” code for RVs/trailers/truck tires) designates the minimum pressure necessary to carry the maximum load. In other words, if a tire reads “Max load single: 3000 lbs at 65 psi cold”, the 65 psi is the minimum cold inflation pressure required to carry the maximum load. So it is sometimes advisable to inflate your tires to above the recommended minimum pressure for smoother riding and safety. Also, make sure that dual tires on the same side have the same inflation pressure.

Correct inflation pressure will give you the best fuel economy, tracking, ride, and longevity; it will also help prevent damage that can cause sudden tire failure. A tire pressure monitoring system should be used to check tire pressures which should always be checked when the tires are cold, so early morning is best. If you do get a flat that destroys a tire, make sure that the replacement tire has the same load rating that matches or exceeds the rating of your original tires.

“Intended use” is the primary difference between truck/trailer tires, and passenger vehicle tires. An automotive tire must meet concerns of durability, good overall performance, low noise, ride comfort, and wet traction. But an automotive tire is not frequently called upon to carry heavy loads for long periods of time.

The primary objectives of an RV/truck/trailer tire are load-carrying capacity, low rolling resistance, stability and long life. These types of tires may include different steel belts, plies and beads, and also the use of thicker cords and larger diameter wire. And they utilize a narrower tread width for reduced rolling resistance, and a shallower tread depth, which aids in tracking. Additionally, they also contain rubber compounds that help them hold up to the elements better while in storage.

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